About your Search

20120901
20120930
STATION
WHUT (Howard University Television) 36
LANGUAGE
English 36
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
not accept what happened from some of the citizens of the united states who offended the prophet mohammed-- peace be upon him. there was also somebody who wanted to burn the koran and this is something we do not accept at all. so the demonstrations were an expression of a high level of anger and a rejection of what is happening and the u.s. embassy represents the symbol of america as a people and government so people, the demonstrators, had a loud voice and as a government, it's our responsibility as the government of egypt we protected the embassy. we do not condone any attack against any embassies or any guests. this is a part of our principles and culture and what our religion orders us to do. >> rose: so the united states government and egyptian government are friends, not enemies? >> ( translated ): we are not enemies, of course. >> rose: you're our friends? >> ( translated ): for sure we are friends. >> rose: allies? >> the u.s. president said otherwise. >> rose: i know he did. but i'm asking the egyptian president. do you consider the united states an ally? >> ( translated ): this
president of the united states bill clinton in conversation with me and my colleague at cbs nora o'donnell. >> rose: do you think this election the president has said that change has to come from outside rather than in washington, that this election has the possibility of producing a change that will be able to overcome gridlock. >> i don't think it to the only has the possibility, i think it almost certainly will. and let me explain why. i think the president's going to win but let's assume governor romney won. if he wins, that almost certainly means the republicans will hold on to the house and it will be about 50/50 in the senate, more or less the way it is now. you can't filibuster a budget. it's the only thing that doesn't require 60 votes in the senate to pass o as opposed to 51. so a lot of the policymaking will be pushed into the budget and he'll just have to pick up one or two people on that. if you assume that he is going to do what he said he's going to do, i think a lot of his priorities will be enacted. and i think it will be bad on the budget side, as i said. includin
at the importance of kazakhstan in the region, and it's a relationship which the united states. "this is america" visits of the republic of kazakhstan. "this is america" is made possible by -- the national education association, the nation's largest advocate for children and public education. poongsan corporation, forging a higher global standard. the ctc foundation, afo communications, and the rotondaro family trust. later, i will talk with kazakhstan's foreign minister. right now, a visit with the u.s. ambassador to kazakhstan, kenneth fairfax. >> what should americans know about kazakhstan? >> i think the short answer is a lot more than they currently do. >> thank you. >> it is the ninth largest country on earth. it is a country that has a rather extraordinary relations with the united states, and yet most people really know either nothing or worse than nothing -- what they have seen in a movie, which is the opposite of reality, of course. there is a lot to learn. >> what are the mutual interests of the two countries, the united states and kazakhstan? >> we have many. you can look at it as an
from both the government and the opposition, the united states is taking the next up in normalizing our commercial relationship. >> the national football league has reached an agreement to end a labor dispute with the referees. the nfl rushed to make the deal after a botched call by replacement officials decided the outcome of a nationally televised game monday night, prompting widespread outrage from fans, journalists, and the teams. you can go to democracynow.org to see our interview with sportswriter dave zirin. in sweden, the 2012 right livelihood awards have been announced to four recipients. turkish environmental activist hayrettin karaca "for a lifetime of tireless advocacy and support for the protection and stewardship of our natural world." afghan women's activist -- a u.s. scholar gene sharp -- and to britain's campaign against arms trade -- handed out annually, the right glove awards are widely known as the alternative nobel prize. those are some of the headlines. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we begin our show with a l
against the united states without some consequencesment now that authority has been removed. the imams and other speakers at friday prayers are free to say almost whatever they want. and that makes the situation far more dangerous. >> protests and deaths in the middle east. and political implications in america when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: . >> rose: additional funding provided by these funders captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. in this presidential election of 2012 foreign policy was not considered to be an important factor. that's all changed now because on monday night when american diplomatic interests came under attack in egypt and libya, tragically ambassador chris stevens and three other americans were killed in benghazi, governor romney has attempted to make some political attacks out of the situation. and here is what he said. >> i think it's a-- a -- -- a terrible course for america to stand in apology for our values. >> rose: president obama responded in kind in
. and that ideology is one of jihad against the united states. they believe that they are engaged on a war which is a war against islam. and the duty of every muslim when islam is under attack to rise up and defend it. so if you can make an argument to the people as they effectively can with this film that islam is under attack it's very easy to capture that popular anger and resentment and to hide behind that, to further an agenda that is essentially al qaeda's agenda that is rarely what it comes back to. it doesn't mat ferr this was ordered by al qaeda or not it may have been investigators are looking at that. but the fact is that the ideology and intent is the same. it's been the same ever since osama bin laden made his first fat what against the united states, a global ideology and intent on the destruction of the united states and the west. >> that is absolutely true. and what adds a sort of extra dimension to the current state of affairs is that now there are people in this country who have questionable agendas of their own. who are giving provocation just as there are people willing to ta
in court early next year. for a discussion with the south african ambassador to the united states, you can go to democracynow.org. in israel and the occupied territories, six palestinians have been killed in a pair of israeli attacks on the gaza strip. the victims included three civilians -- two of them brothers -- struck by an israeli tank shell. israel said it was targeting militants planning attacks. the vice chair of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral james winnefeld, visited israel on thursday amidst ongoing talk of military action against iran. he met with the israeli defense minister just days after the top u.s. military official, general martin dempsey, said he doesn't want to beat complicit in an israeli attack. barak said the u.s. and israel share the same goals, but are on different timetables. >> today i met with the vice chairman of the u.s. joint chiefs of staff along with the american ambassador and discussed the situation in the region, and talked about iran. we are facing a joint challenge, but our clocks are in different tempos. israel is maintaining its right for soverei
and say to the president of the united states, "you must act." we didn't think that the proposed bill was commensurate to all of the suffering, to the beatings, to the jailing, to the killing that had occurred in the south. amy goodman: congressman john lewis. he's just written a new book called across that bridge: life lessons and a vision for change. i'll continue the interview with him in a moment. [break] amy goodman: "ain't gonna let nobody turn me round," the sncc freedom singers, a group that traveled the country singing and fundraising for the student nonviolent coordinating committee. congressmember john lewis was one of the chairs of sncc. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report, as we return to my interview with the now 13- term democratic congressman, john lewis of georgia, arrested more than 40 times as he fought for voting rights and against segregation in america. just before malcolm x was assassinated, john lewis met with him in africa. they spent several days together. i asked john lewis where they met, what they talked about. rep. john lewi
the convention. >> the president of the united states of america, barack obama. >> win or lose, this campaign is the last time that barack obama will ask the american people for their trust. democrats savored the moment, but he seemed impient to address a troubled nation far beyond the convention hall. >> knowur problems can be solved. our challenges can be met. the past we offer may be harder, but it leads to a better place, and i'm asking to you choose that future. >> republicans have framed this election as a referendum on the obama economy, but he said voters face a choice. >> and on every issue, the choice you face won't just be between two candidates or two parties, it will be a choice between two different paths for america. ours is a fight to restore the values that built the largest middle class and the strongest economy the world has ever known. >> by contrast, he said republicans were about little more than tax cuts for the rich, and he mocked mitt romney's inexperience on foreign policy. >> they want to take us back to an era of blustering and blundering that cost america so dearl
of the death penalty in the united states. we will speak with his sister kimberly davis, ben jealous, and laura moye. as italy upholds the convictions of 23 cia agents for kidnapping an egyptian cleric off the streets of milan, we will look at why the obama administration has refused to prosecute anyone involved in the u.s. government secrets torture and rendition program. we will speak with alfred mccoy here in madison. he is author of "torture and impunity." >> there is an absolute ban on torture for a very good reason. torture taps into the deepest recesses of the human consciousness where creation and destruction exist. with a capacity for cruelty and kindness to exist. it has a powerful, perverse appeal. and once it starts, but the perpetrators and the powerful who order them, let it spread. it spreads out of control. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. road in the madison, wisconsin. and this one person has been killed in pakistan as protesters fill the streets across several cities in what is expected t
insurgent group that the united states has listed as a terror group and have said they will not sit down and have these discussions with them. >> thank you very much. theet's take a look at other stories making headlines. the presidents of sudan and south sudan have resumed talks about -- over the disputes that brought them close to war this year. they're trying to find a comprehensive agreement on issues like the border, security, and oil. the u.n. has threatened sanctions if a deal is not signed. the day after an avalanche in northern the paul with france, germany, and spain, at least one person died. they were engulfed by snow. one catholic in germany has opted out of paying a religious tax and has been denied religious burial. endorsed by the fact that it comes into effect today, this sharp increase for the number of germans who have decided not to pay. those are civilian casualties mounting in the conflict in syria. the syrian army is also seeing an increasing number of soldiers. many of them are in the western coastal region. a stronghold of the minority sect. the chief corresponde
tarbging about issues of trust. the united states needs to be able to trust us as partners. >> what happens now at bagram with its controversial history surrounding the treatment of detainees will be closely watched in afghanistan and far beyond. >> joining us now is our correspondent jonathan beal. so clearly the americans, very concerned about these high risk detainees and the afghans not able perhaps to guarantee their security. >> yes, simply very surprising given that this agreement was signed six months ago. so today was just the form ceremony of handing over the detention facility. but still disputes over what should happen to some of these detainees, and america making clear they want to hold on, at least keep a foot in the door of bagram and to retain control of part of that prison and to continue, of course, cap suring insurgents, taking them there, questioning them, sbrer gating them and possibly handing them over to the afghans. i think the concern among human rights groups is you might have a situation, a detention facility where americans think -- that is not something that fo
: nobody wants the united states to do that. >> no, i know that! that's why there's a it will bit of disingenuousness of people saying "what must we do?" a no-fly zone. okay, what happens when the syrians shoot at the no-fly zone. what happens when the russians get involved in it's a problem from hell. it'ser the to believe see what's going on. >> is there any answer in terms of somehow a group of countries getting together, neighbors and others, including iran even though that would be very difficult for everybody to come to some kind so solutions because they have the russians, iranians, americans. >> people would have... >>. >> rose: and arabs. >> and iraq. to the extent that it worked it worked because there was one power there. can you imagine a committee of the iranians, the russians, the chinese. and that's my dilemma with it. i don't know how it's going to end. i think this could burn on in different forms for a long time. charlie, step back, what are we seeing? we're seeing two huge political orders crumbling at once. one is called the european union where the supra natio
. >> it was an unhappy time for him freur years ago. a moment of great triumph. >> important for the united states was elect barack obama. >> charlie:how would you define the relationship other than they need each other. >> i think they have genuine respect for each other. they talk more than you think. i think that was a process that built up after what was a contentious set of primaries. but i think from the moment that president obama got into office, president clinton really tried to do his best to support him when they reached out he always helped. >> charlie:that's not necessarily the story you hear, john. people say that the president has said -- former president he got more phone calls from george bush than he did from barack obama in the first year or 2. >> i think if you asked him that question today he would say they have a very serious, respectful relationship and they talk and they. >> charlie:but the point is what people around him say and people who know his thoughts said. >> a lot of people like to trade in that kind of gossip. but i know the reality. the reality is, you know, bara
and everything from police surveillance to amateur photography. in the united states, congress has told the u.s. airspace regulator to open up north america to drones by 2015. but are we ready for a world in which thousands of drones are patrolling our skies? >> they are the eyes and ears of the armed forces. a decade ago, less than 5% of u.s. military aircraft were unmanned. now 40% have no pilots onboard. many think the f-35 will be the last conventional fighters ever flown by the r.a.f. but the role of the drone is now changing. british skies are about to open up to thousands of civilian drones. who is watching the drone operators and how safe is this new technology? next to an army training zone in the british countryside is a glimpse of how drones could be used in the future. it might not look like the spy planes in afghanistan or yemen, but this is one of the first commercial uses of an unmanned aircraft in the u.k. itself. as the cost of digital cameras come down, some new applications are starting to become possible. >> 38,000 feet, 1,000 knots, 76%. >> these light-weight drones fly b
. this is for every family and the united states whether they're documented are not to continue fighting for your rights and organizing. >> i have been living here for 18 years. i pay taxes. i pay more taxes than citibank. i am here because we're against the separation of families [indiscernible] and against the discrimination. >> i came to this country when i was 15, undocumented. i am here and i am not afraid. i am doing this for all of my committee, for the undocumented community. i'm tired of living in fear. i am tired of not being able to have a driver's license or go to school because i do not have legal status. for being human, i have rights. i need everyone to recognize my civil rights. we are in north carolina at the dnc, and we're trying to do civil disobedience on the streets. we're here in front of the dnc and want to tell them that they need to know what we need and they need to do something about and. we're showing them that we're not scared anymore. we're not afraid. we don't got papers and we're not afraid. >> if you got arrested today, would you face deportation? >> yes. >> educa
that come in. the fact that planned parenthood has tripled billed the united states government for services it did not perform, and it's unbelievable fraud -- unbelievable -- and that case was rejected by a district court. on appeal, the district court was overturned by the ninth circuit. and it is going forward to discovery, and the discovery is absolutely shocking. what they're doing, the fraud, and they are hitting the federal government for close to a billion dollars a year. it is unbelievable. the numbers go up. it was $200 million and then $300 million, and now i think it is close to $500 million of taxpayer money that is going to planned parenthood. and i might add, president obama said he would be willing to shut the government down if the restriction on planned parenthood continued in the negotiation. but, kristi, it is fraudulent in the extreme. and those cases are going to be body blows to planned parenthood. we're talking about huge sums. the whistle-blower complaint is triple damages. >> i think what is so fascinating, there have been so many issues for so long. why is that sup
for president of the united states. >> republican presidential nominee mitt romney delivers his acceptance address and the last nine of the republican national convention. -- on the last night of the republican national convention. >> i can guarantee you this, it barack obama is reelected, you'll be right. >> mitt romney's speech was seen as the most important of his political life. but it may have been overshadowed by the republicans mystery speaker who turned out to the actor and director clint eastwood. >> i would just like to say something, ladies and gentlemen. something i think is very important is that you, we -- we own this country. [applause] >> the justice department dropped its investigation of cia interrogators for their role in the deaths of prisoners in iraq and afghanistan. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. mitt romney accepted the republican presidential nomination thursday night with a vow to revive the u.s. economy and a plea to voters disappointed with president obama's first term. >> ho
failed to invest in those basic pillars of economic growth that has made the united states the greatest job generating and opportunity expanding-nation on the planet. >> fair enough. that's what i want to talk about, america having to do with education and climate change and infrastructure and science and all those things. >> absolutely. >> that will give people an opportunity to believe in the future. >> right. >> because too many people are living at home and too many people see the next generation not having the same advantage that they had, that has to do with the psyche of the united states today. >> it absolutely does. but you know, our parents did not, you know, the things that they created, that our grandparents created were not done for free. we need to be, we need to invest-- i mean i once saw tom freedman who is from maryland speak to the national governors. and i saw him talk about the five pillars that have made us a great nation. you know, one of them is the fact that we always invest more in every again raise in higher and better education for every generation. >> right.
and afghanistan, to become the government, and i'm not sure any country, either the united states or i don't hear of anyone else, who's willing to take on that responsibility. the other proposal is to arm the opposition. that's certainly something you can look at, but make sure you know who you're arming and what you're liable to get from that solution. then provide safe havens for people in other countries may be a possibility, but i think stick with the political, diplomatic and economic track for the time being. tavis: again, i'm so tempted to continue picking your brain about these hotspots around the globe, but want to, again, as i promised, get to the text. there are a number of things, a number of political issues, for that matter, decisions that you've made in your life that you finally open up and talk about in the text, which allows me to some degree to continue this line of questioning. for example, you talked for the first time extensively about the un speech, and everybody knows when you say colin powell and the un speech, you know what we're talking about. speaking of lessons learne
inside the united states. late last week the obama administration asked an appeals court for an emergency stay of a lower court ruling striking down a controversial statute that gave the government power to indefinitely detain anyone it considered a terrorism suspect anywhere in the world without charge or trial. judge katherine forced had ruled the national defense authorization act, or ndaa, cannot be used to hold people in indefinite military detention on suspicion of having substantially supported al qaeda or its allies. for more on these stories, and for michigan, the home of both mitt romney and his father who was governor here, we're joined now by marcy wheeler. she is an investigative blogger who runs emptywheel.net. start off by talking about guantanamo and what happened to this prisoner. >> adnan latif is a yemeni who was born in 1980. in 1994, he had a head injury that crack is skull. he went to jordan for medical treatment. he is corporate he kept trying to figure out how he could get this debilitating head injury fixed. the workers that if you go to pakistan, i will help you
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)